The Lemtrada diary. 

Cats, Lemtrada, Medication, MS, Multiple Sclerosis, Snazzy pyjamas

Hey folks! Alright? You thought I’d gone, didn’t you? Were you upset, distraught, bereft? Say yes. I simply couldn’t bear it if I believed that you didn’t notice my absence. Say you did. Tell me you still care. You still love me? As I love you and will for all eternity! Too much? O my dears. Here I am. Ready? Let us get this ‘party’ ‘started’. 

  
Day zero

My treatment, provisionally, was scheduled for Monday. Alas, I was unable to secure a bed until yesterday – Thursday. Twas but no room at the inn. If you get me. But, rejoice! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! In the evening I made my tentative arrival. I sat on my bed and dispatched my parents to get coffee or something so I could get some ‘me time’, unpack, appear to be an actual capable adult etc. Although acknowledged, I wasn’t admitted for some time. My uxurious (!) D arrived post Mum & Dad leaving and we dined together at the hospital restaurant. The romance! I’m pretty sure D swooned. He’d had a busy day. Fast forward. Skip the boring bits. Rather the even more boring bits. Sleep difficult. Man shouting for help for extended period through night. Person in next bed intermittently annoyingly snoring. Gar! Doctor approaches bed wielding small torch at midnight. I’ve started to drift into proper sleep and answer his questions confusedly. 

Day one

I wake early. Everything happens early. Correction. Some things happen early. I’m given an antiviral tablet.  I fall asleep to my audiobook. I’m woken all startled and starry eyed like.  Bed sheets are changed. A cannula is inserted by a lovely nurse. We talk about tattoos (she shows me pictures on her phone); being a public sector worker under the Tories (*spits*); the similarity of experience for teachers and nurses – bureaucracy, low morale; me. This must mean it’s all happening! I text a picture to, hmm, people – so they can see I’m all ready. I wait. 

And wait

Wait a bit more. 

Read a novel. Really. The whole of one! A Disorder Peculiar to the Country.  As seen on Catastrophe and listed as one of Sharon Horgan’s cultural highlights in the Observer. I’m nothing if not predictable. It’s good. Check it out.   

Ate hospital food. I was expecting awfulness but it was surprisingly okay. Boredom in hospital = much eating just to pass the time. Downer. Not enough tea though. I require pretty much perpetual chai. Large flask delivery from Mum & Dad tomorrow will hopefully fix this. Yawn. Boring detail. Soz, man. Onward! 

Because we haven’t seen him for a while.

 
15:00 or thereabouts. One hour steroid infusion. Another antiviral tablet. Paracetamol and antihistamine. To ward off possible side effects. Steroids give you an unpleasant metallic taste in your mouth. Plus you can’t sleep. Hence this (it’s past midnight, sister!) and why steroidal muscle men are so angry. 

Wait an hour. 

Lemtrada infusion! Why we’re all goddamn here. Takes four hours. Blood pressure, pulse, temperature taken every fifteen minutes by me, surprise and very very very welcome visitor D, a nurse. D told off for sitting on the bed. Even though he basically weighs that same as an averagely sized bird’s nest. Theoretically. 

It was fine. 

Side effects usually manifest themselves on days three or four. Rashes. Itching. Stamped on by antihistamine ‘boot’ easily and rapidly. Not too worried. Naïveté? Hubris? We’ll see, innit.  

So. All in all. At and well after the actual literal end of the day. All’s good. 

Goodnight x

Just write something, anything…

Fatigue, Life is hard, Medication, MS, Multiple Sclerosis, Snazzy pyjamas

This blogging business is hard. See, I want to ‘keep at it’. Actually stick to something. For once in my goddamn life. Develop a ‘voice’. Find out if I can ‘write’. Whilst also informing, educating and entertaining. Although, however, but – I have naught to say. 

Look at this while I have a think.  

 
Yes, it’s a dog sadly woofing. In a pop-art style. Wonderful. 

I’m on my summer holiday. My ‘summer’ ‘holiday’ rather. It’s cold, grey, raining and I’m at home. I hope death isn’t like this. Remember, I’m a cheery ray of sunshine!  

 
In my previous, like, billion posts, I’ve been droning on about that recurring character of my life I have named Fatigue.  

Notice the capital letter proper noun-ness I have awarded ‘him’. Thank you. I’ve had pins stuck in him. Acupuncture, I believe ‘they’ call it. Has it worked? Maybe. Hard to say. Perhaps. Not sure. Could have done? Might have. I think I’m less fatigued. Monsieur Fatigue may have taken himself far away from me. Hopefully one of the pins went right through his eye-hole into his tiny man-brain thus rendering him dead and therefore ineffective. I hope his ghost doesn’t come and haunt me. I don’t want spooky fatigue. I hear that’s worse even than normal fatigue. Anyhow. That’s that. As ‘they’ (who?) say. 

Next paragraph. 

Medication.  See post: Pills, thrills and bellyaches. Written in the past. By me. 

So, if you’ve completed the required reading you’ll be au fait with my current ‘situation’, which is that I’m nearing the end of my Tysabri time. And I would really prefer to end it sooner rather than later. I’ve got an appointment near the end of August with a neurologist to, hopefully, take the first steps in what, I believe, Simon Cowell requires us to call the ‘Lemtrada journey’. What’s Lemtrada?, you’re undoubtedly asking, in that whiney tone you reserve for asking questions. I’ll endeavour to answer but, I’ll issue a warning, I can’t be bothered to do any research right now, not in the mood, so I’m going to rely on my own shaky powers of recall. 

Lemtrada. Lemtrada does something that ‘turns off’ your/the MS in some way that I can’t remember and don’t fully understand. It’s administered as an infusion over five days, then a year later, over three days. And that’s it. Except, I think, that can happen two more times. Or something. You have to stay in hospital while you get infused, so that’s an opportunity to get some snazzy new pyjamas and, fingers crossed, a stylish robe and some excellent slippers.  

These are snazzy pyjamas indeed.


The reason you have to be hospital bound is because your immune system is being totally wiped out so you’re all susceptible to infection and have to be monitored by medical professionals. Lest you go and die. I’m being melodramatic, this doesn’t happen. I’m expecting a nasty rash, mainly. Post infusion you have to have monthly blood and urine tests for – I’m going to say a year, could be forever though. I think it’s a year. Then there are other possible side effects, but none as scary as PML. (I’m not explaining this, it’s your problem if you haven’t done the reading I set). The key one, I think, is your thyroid might break. That’s not too scary, my mum hasn’t even got a thyroid anymore – it was all cut out of her neck just before she got pregnant with me, or something like that, I wasn’t listening. And that’d be a pain, but it won’t kill you. And that’s generally my main worry, I’m funny like that. So that’s what’s happening. 

I did have summat to say after all! Well done me! It’s been nice, hasn’t it? Catching up for a good old chat? Let’s not leave it so long next time. Awww. Mate. You take care. 

Until next time…