A very brief Lemtrada update. 

Lemtrada, Life is hard, Medication, MS, Multiple Sclerosis, Noise

 As I write this egg timer length post, it’s 5:29 and the elderly lady in the bed across the room is snoring like a trooper; I’m trying to block out her alarmng growls through the medium of Kate Bush.   
Day two

In my previous post I believe I dropped the words ‘naïveté’ and ‘hubris’: O my friends, how appropriate these revealed themselves to be yesterday eve’. The (in)famous Lemtrada rash did reveal itself in all its itchy and unattractive glory. Didn’t love it, gotta say. But, true to what I’ve been told, an IV shot of antihistamine sent it on its way with relative swiftness. Still though. Another club I’ve reluctantly joined. Felt pretty shitty throughout the night to boot. Slightly headachy. Slightly nauseous. Slightly stomach achey. Slightly night-twitchy. Thank god I wasn’t at sea; who can say how much worse that’d have been?

A final grain of salt tumbles through to the bottom chamber, time’s up my friends. 

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The Lemtrada diary. 

Cats, Lemtrada, Medication, MS, Multiple Sclerosis, Snazzy pyjamas

Hey folks! Alright? You thought I’d gone, didn’t you? Were you upset, distraught, bereft? Say yes. I simply couldn’t bear it if I believed that you didn’t notice my absence. Say you did. Tell me you still care. You still love me? As I love you and will for all eternity! Too much? O my dears. Here I am. Ready? Let us get this ‘party’ ‘started’. 

  
Day zero

My treatment, provisionally, was scheduled for Monday. Alas, I was unable to secure a bed until yesterday – Thursday. Twas but no room at the inn. If you get me. But, rejoice! O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! In the evening I made my tentative arrival. I sat on my bed and dispatched my parents to get coffee or something so I could get some ‘me time’, unpack, appear to be an actual capable adult etc. Although acknowledged, I wasn’t admitted for some time. My uxurious (!) D arrived post Mum & Dad leaving and we dined together at the hospital restaurant. The romance! I’m pretty sure D swooned. He’d had a busy day. Fast forward. Skip the boring bits. Rather the even more boring bits. Sleep difficult. Man shouting for help for extended period through night. Person in next bed intermittently annoyingly snoring. Gar! Doctor approaches bed wielding small torch at midnight. I’ve started to drift into proper sleep and answer his questions confusedly. 

Day one

I wake early. Everything happens early. Correction. Some things happen early. I’m given an antiviral tablet.  I fall asleep to my audiobook. I’m woken all startled and starry eyed like.  Bed sheets are changed. A cannula is inserted by a lovely nurse. We talk about tattoos (she shows me pictures on her phone); being a public sector worker under the Tories (*spits*); the similarity of experience for teachers and nurses – bureaucracy, low morale; me. This must mean it’s all happening! I text a picture to, hmm, people – so they can see I’m all ready. I wait. 

And wait

Wait a bit more. 

Read a novel. Really. The whole of one! A Disorder Peculiar to the Country.  As seen on Catastrophe and listed as one of Sharon Horgan’s cultural highlights in the Observer. I’m nothing if not predictable. It’s good. Check it out.   

Ate hospital food. I was expecting awfulness but it was surprisingly okay. Boredom in hospital = much eating just to pass the time. Downer. Not enough tea though. I require pretty much perpetual chai. Large flask delivery from Mum & Dad tomorrow will hopefully fix this. Yawn. Boring detail. Soz, man. Onward! 

Because we haven’t seen him for a while.

 
15:00 or thereabouts. One hour steroid infusion. Another antiviral tablet. Paracetamol and antihistamine. To ward off possible side effects. Steroids give you an unpleasant metallic taste in your mouth. Plus you can’t sleep. Hence this (it’s past midnight, sister!) and why steroidal muscle men are so angry. 

Wait an hour. 

Lemtrada infusion! Why we’re all goddamn here. Takes four hours. Blood pressure, pulse, temperature taken every fifteen minutes by me, surprise and very very very welcome visitor D, a nurse. D told off for sitting on the bed. Even though he basically weighs that same as an averagely sized bird’s nest. Theoretically. 

It was fine. 

Side effects usually manifest themselves on days three or four. Rashes. Itching. Stamped on by antihistamine ‘boot’ easily and rapidly. Not too worried. Naïveté? Hubris? We’ll see, innit.  

So. All in all. At and well after the actual literal end of the day. All’s good. 

Goodnight x

Things I believe to be true – some of which manifestly are.

Bodies of water, Death, Dissolving into liquid sky

There is no final, universal meaning. The answer isn’t 42. There (probably) isn’t a God, and if there is – she stopped listening ages ago. We are but insignificant specks living out our brief lives on a spinning rock hurtling through cold infinite space. Think of ants crawling across a blank sheet of paper. I hope I’m wrong on this. Or right. I can’t decide which is worse.

Our beautiful planet is going to become an increasingly hostile place on which to exist over the coming decades. It is too late for the effects of devastating climate change to be checked. We’ve blown it. Oh well. C’est la vie. That’s all I have to say.

O Europe. Where once, in recent history, the fall of borders was a cause for celebration, now they’re reappearing. Union crumbles, predictably, unfortunately, into division. Revolutions circle entirely, ending up where they started. O Europe. I’m scared of where you’re – we’re – heading. History has a habit of repeating, but now we’ve got weapons that can take life, and lots of it, with even greater efficacy. Out, out, brief candles.

Our response to the refugee crisis, so far, has been…lamentable? I honestly don’t think we have yet developed language that can adequately convey the complete horror of what’s happening. The overwhelming feeling of helplessness that is engendered. I read the papers, watch the news and cry. But, so what? Who are my tears helping? O Europe. O, O, O.

And before we can deal with our planet, with our continent, what about our country? Are we rushing back into some kind of 11th Century feudal system, via the Victorian workhouse, and whatever came between the two, My history isn’t great, you may have noticed.

Aaaaooooooorrrrryyygghhhhhh (Anguished scream).

I am so grateful that, by accident of birth, pure serendipity, I was born where I was, and ended up ‘middle-class’ with a profession that awards me adequate pay. I’m not complacent through. Or at least I try not to be. Complacency suggests contentment with the status quo  “no matter how fucked up the status quo is.” And it’s really fucked up.

It’s very hard to imagine yourself as an old person. I’m talking eighty, or whatever. When you’re a kid, you probably imagine being eighteen, maybe twenty-one. I mean, truly visualise yourself at that age. But not far beyond that.  I think I’ll die before I’m seventy. Actually, before that. I’ve always been convinced that’s what will happen. It’s fine, I’m not distraught or anything. I just can’t picture me getting old. Like, properly old. Or, is it like that for everybody? Maybe the MS thing is part of it. But, I’m convinced it’s something I’ve always felt. Oh, I dunno. Who cares?

I guess I should mention MS, as this blog does trade under that umbrella. I’m feeling alright at the moment. The Lemtrada themed hospital stay continues to get closer; I’ve got new pyjamas. I’m actually quite looking forward to having the excuse to do nothing but read for five days. Except, in all likelihood, I’ll feel all ill and sick and therefore be unable to concentrate on actual printed words. Alas.